Oberon Council Report 2008

Cours Oberon Council Report 2008, tutoriel & guide de travaux pratiques en pdf.

2008 Oberon Council Elections

Election of Councillors
Oberon Council is an undivided council with nine councillors elected for a period of four years. At the 2008 Local Government Elections 16 candidates contested the election for the position of councillor. Details of the candidates who stood for election at the 2008 Local Government Elections can be found at Appendix 4.
Councillors commence their role on the day that the election is declared and hold the position for a period of four years, until the day of the next Local Government elections.

Election of the Mayor
Twenty-seven councils in NSW held an election for the popularly elected mayor at the 2008 Local Government Elections, 16 were in rural councils and 11 in metropolitan councils. At the 2008 elections there was one uncontested mayoral election in The Council of the City of Botany Bay.
Upon election the mayor holds office for a period of four years, until the day of the next Local Government elections.

Council Elected Mayor
The mayor of Oberon Council is elected by the elected councillors in a council meeting shortly after election day. The NSWEC plays no role in the conduct of this election.

Referendum
Councils must seek the approval of the electors by holding a constitutional referendum prior to amending certain arrangements associated with the council structure. Voting on a referendum issue is compulsory for all electors enrolled in the Local Government Area.
Issues to be decided by constitutional referendum include:
x the division of the council area into wards or the abolishment of wards; x the election of the mayor by electors or by the elected councillors; x increases or decreases in the number of councillors; or
x to change the method of election of ward councillors.
Councils are bound by constitutional referendum outcomes until a change is approved at a subsequent constitutional referendum. At the 2008 Local Government Elections 15 councils conducted a referendum with a total of 17 referenda questions. Two councils had two referenda questions. 11 referendum questions were endorsed. For metropolitan councils, three of the five councils were successful in the questions put to their communities. The corresponding figure for non metropolitan councils was seven of ten councils.
In terms of the nature of the referenda questions, the following table shows the results by question type.

Poll
Councils may seek direction from electors on any matter by conducting a poll. The results of polls do not bind council to any action but provide the council with information to assist in their decision making processes.
Eight councils across NSW conducted a poll at the 2008 Local Government Elections.
At the 2008 Local Government Elections Oberon Council did not hold a poll.

Method of Voting

Councillor Election
Section 285 of the Act prescribes that the voting system in a contested election of a councillor or councillors is to be:
x optional preferential if the number of councillors to be elected is one or two; x proportional representation if the number of councillors to be elected is three
or more.
The election of councillors for Oberon Council at the 2008 Local Government Elections was Proportional Representation (PR).
Proportional Representation
Proportional representation voting is used when three or more candidates are to be elected.
To Elect Three or More Candidates
In proportional representation voting electors are required to mark their preferences for at least the number of candidates equal to half the number of vacancies.
In an election where there are three or more councillors to be elected, candidates can form a group on the ballot paper and can have a group voting square for above the line voting.
Where there are group voting squares on the ballot paper, electors can vote above the line by placing the number ‘1’ in one group voting square and can place consecutive numbers beginning with ‘2’ in as many other group voting squares as they wish. Placing a ‘1’ above the line in only one group voting square indicates preferences for all the candidates in that group, in their order on the ballot paper. The vote stops with the last candidate in that group and preferences do not continue to any other candidates on the ballot paper. Placing a ‘2’ and following consecutive numbers in group voting squares indicates preferences for the candidates in these groups in their order on the ballot paper.
Alternatively, electors can vote for individual candidates below the line by placing preferences next to the candidates of their choice for at least half the number of vacancies. The number of preferences required is shown in the directions for voting on the ballot paper. They may then continue numbering preferences to the extent they choose.
Where there are no group voting squares, electors can vote for individual candidates by placing preferences next to the candidates of their choice for at least half the number of vacancies. The number of preferences required is shown in the directions for voting on the ballot paper.

Mayoral election
The election of the popularly elected mayor is determined by Optional Preferential voting. Electors are required to mark their ballot paper by placing a ‘1’ in the square next to the candidate of their choice and may, if they wish, vote for other candidates by giving preferences for as many other candidates as they wish.

Referendum or Poll
For a referendum or poll electors are required to write ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ on their ballot paper.
LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF GRAPHS
THE 2008 LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS
2008 OBERON COUNCIL ELECTIONS
ELECTION PREPARATION
CONDUCT OF THE ELECTIONS
ELECTION CONCLUSION
FUTURE DIRECTION
APPENDICE

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